Scuba Diving & Snorkeling - Recent Questions, Troubleshooting & Support


Hi,

To access a downloadable manual you will need to go to the below link and create a login for yourself which will give you access to the manual.

http://www.genesisscuba.com/manuals.php

Hope this assists you.

Best regards,

Dave

Genesis... | Answered on Nov 13, 2018


Try to spray the commercial available mist to lower surface tension in order to avoid build-up of condensed water

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Nov 02, 2018


how to cHEAt PLssssssssss!

Crossfire Fixed... | Answered on Oct 27, 2018


Soak it in fresh water overnight, there is a high chance that salt crystals have built up around the depth sensor holes in the vipers case. Just had the exact same problem on a dive today and this has cured the issue.

Suunto "Vyper"... | Answered on Oct 03, 2018


give me ecoin 2000

Crossfire Fixed... | Answered on Sep 18, 2018


Contact Thermal Dynamics directly to find out.

Thermal Dynamics... | Answered on Jul 30, 2018


who knows what is a sheet mask? seems this is not a repair question on a repair forum

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Jul 04, 2018


If I'm reading this right you have an octopus which is a second emergency regulator for your buddy if he is in trouble. Where the original regulator hooks to the valve that goes on your tank ther should be a blank with a screw in it . This is where the octopus screws in . You will have a rubber o ring in side. Put it on the end of the threads from the octopus hose and insert it into the hole the screw once occupied.. The screw is just there to fill the blanks hole and can be thrown out.

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Apr 24, 2018


Needs a seal rebuild kit.... They are simple to do, open the regulator up first and check that there isn't any salt or dirt inside

Sherwood Scuba... | Answered on Apr 24, 2018


Has the fuel pressure been checked when it fails to start? If not that needs to be done, I suspect the fuel pump is defective.

Halonet 94-97... | Answered on Mar 08, 2018


"Wet suits and dry suits are very important when it comes to scuba diving. Your normal body temperature hovers around 98.6F (37C). If you are scuba diving in water that is cooler than your body temperature your temperature will drop. In all water, even the warmest, tropical waters, you will need thermal protection, like a wet suit, dry suit or dive skin, to keep warm and to keep safe while scuba diving. The cold affects our ability to think and our physical response time slows, which can lead to an accident. Warm tropical water will begin to feel cold after prolonged scuba diving, so it is always a good idea to wear light insulation at a minimum. When choosing thermal protection, like a wet suit or dry suit, you need to consider the following factors: Water temperature Your activity level during a dive Your body size You should always wear more insulation in colder water and lighter insulation in warmer water. Your level of activity can be a good indicator of how much insulation you should wear during a scuba dive. The more active you are during a dive the more heat your body generates and the warmer you remain throughout your dive. Larger scuba divers may need less insulation than smaller scuba divers and small, muscular scuba divers may need less insulation than larger scuba divers. It is important for you to try different amounts of insulation in differing water temperatures to determine what you need. Some scuba divers need more insulation than others, regardless of activity or size. Some scuba divers can dive in tropical water wearing only a lycra body suit, commonly known as a dive skin, while others need a 2mm wet suit. Some scuba divers can dive in cold water wearing only a 6mm wet suit, while others need the protection of a dry suit. If you are scuba diving in water below 55F (12.7C), a dry suit is the warmest type of thermal insulation available. Dive skins, wet suits and dry suits also protect your skin from cuts, scrapes, abrasions and stings which can occur while you are scuba diving. A simple brush against specific forms of coral and fish can cause painful irritations and burns on bare skin, but may not be noticeable or even occur, if your skin is protected."

ACCO Brands... | Answered on Mar 03, 2018


Most straps are universal. But if you want an exact replacement just seach www.usdivers.com for your local US Divers retail store.

U.S. Divers... | Answered on Nov 25, 2017


get that from <a> here </a>masskarafestivals.com/masks/

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Nov 11, 2017


The IS200 is a popular car with car enthusiasts, there will be a forum for this car. The problem is most probably either a fuse or a relay of which a car has many. These simply unplug and can be replaced with a matching one. Fuses are colour coded and transparent. You can find one of the fuse boxes and pull each fuse and look at it in turn. If you find a blown one simply plug in a good one of the same colour.

Hopefully you find the fuse and replace it. However the cause of the blown fuse my still be there and the fuse will just blow again. At least if you know this much then the garage can't get the better of you.

Turbo... | Answered on Nov 02, 2017

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