Question about 1997 Nissan Pickup

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Alternator will not charge

Cannot get the charger to charge. the battery and alternator is new. The alternator voltage output is only battery voltage. This voltage goes down when I start the engine so the alternator output may be nil. There seems to be only about three volts to the brushes. I removed the plug on the alternator and checked the voltage to the brushes while the engine was running (only about three volts. HELP

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  • Nissan Master
  • 50,967 Answers

The new alternator could be defective.

Posted on Dec 04, 2013

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: vanett charging problem

red & white feed to alternator,fed from top terminal of capless bulb in charging light, had a break in it. This is in the plastic tube that goes across the front of the engine in a r/h/d/ vehicle.

Posted on Sep 10, 2008

  • 35 Answers

SOURCE: 95 pathfinder wont stay running and doesnt charge

Check all grounds running from all electrical, If there is not a good contact this problem will occur, when you locate the ground surface take sandpaper or even a knife and scrape or sand the connector and the ground surface then reconnect it, It should return to normal if not then it could be a solenoid possibly but not sure

Posted on Sep 16, 2008

  • 1779 Answers

SOURCE: 1992 Nissan Pathfinder charging problems

How long did the 2nd alt. last before it died? The voltage regulator is, I believe, attached to the alternator. Have u had the voltage regulator checked?

Posted on Jan 04, 2009

BlackOnyx
  • 102 Answers

SOURCE: nissan terrano 1996 td27 charging issue.

Did you hear the one about the Terrano with a charging problem?
Just fix it by replacing the thermostat!
Seriously - check your temperature gauge does it take ages for the needle to barely get off cold? (and is the heater useless?)
The needle should get to just below half way in 2 or 3 minutes.
If the thermostat is stuck open, then the engine does not get up to temperature.
The glow plug control senses the engine temperature is cold, so the glow plugs stay on for an extended period of time (sometimes 10 to 15 minutes) - short trips particularly in winter, with more headlight driving - the alternator can't keep up with the current being drawn off and from time to time you will end up with a flat battery!
A thermostat is cheap, and easy to replace (three bolts and about a half litre of coolant - I pumped the coolant from the top of the radiator, and didn't spill a drop when the thermostat housing was removed).
Sure enough, as the engine temperature reached about 50C, the glow plugs turned off.

Posted on Jul 21, 2009

toneman2121
  • 775 Answers

SOURCE: 02 maxima battery wont stay charged. Took to auto

that seems very, very low. almost what the battery voltage is supposed to be. actually i would say that's not charging and you need to replace the alternator. normal voltage output is 13.5-15 volts

Posted on Mar 05, 2010

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2 Answers

Does the ECM control the alternator charging amperage/voltage on a 2004 Suzuki aerio? New alternator only charges @12.5. Won't charge enough to keep ahead of necessary power draw.


Some vehicles are fitted with a smart charging system that is designed to prevent the alternator charging during acceleration to free a few horsepower to help.

My experience of these is very limited but there is an ECU that controls them and the battery, charging or ignition light using information from the engine management system.
The alternator generally has an extra plug with about four or five wires which when disconnected render the alternator a standard machine sensed type.

Japanese vehicles used separate voltage regulators longer than most types. You either need experience or a wiring diagram for good fault diagnosis but mostly it is unnecessary to check the charging current of an alternator which bears little significance unless being tested with a graduated load or adjustable carbon pile.

The current output of a healthy alternator is dependent on the terminal voltage of the battery which in turn is dependent on the electrical load placed upon it. Switching on the lights should lower the voltage and increase the alternator output. If the battery is particularly good the voltage won't fall very much and the current won't increase as much as expected...

Measuring the battery voltage with the engine running at about 2000/2500 rpm is sufficient for most purposes. With nothing switched on and a fully charged battery it should be around 14.5 volts and with everything switched on (lights, HRW, heater fan, etc.) a healthy alternator should continue to maintain a voltage above that of a healthy fully charged battery (13.2 volts).

If the voltage isn't maintained on load the charging system, probably the alternator, is faulty and should be independently tested.

Jan 25, 2017 | Suzuki Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Having cranking issues and battery isnt charging as suppose to 2004 f250 diesel crew cab


need more info year make model clean your terminals check the output voltage on your alt with a multimeter 12 plus is good if you have a maint free batt look in the eye and check the color or take it to the auto parts store theyll check it for free


\

Apr 12, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Charging problem


Check that your alternator is actually charging the battery. With volt meter and car running check for at least 13.5 volts at battery. If not check fuses, big red wire from alternator to battery and for actual output of alternator at bolt where big red wire attaches to alternator. Should have battery voltage with car not running and at least 13.5 when engine is idling(motor running)

Feb 06, 2016 | 1995 Geo Tracker

1 Answer

2nd newly rebuilt alternator burning out.


Due to the nature of the battery technology used with vehicles the alternator is mostly incapable of charging the battery. The car alternator is designed to keep a fully charged battery fully charged and to provide all the power for the car equipment.

The alternator charge rate is regulated by a voltage regulator. Because the alternator output is connected to the battery, the alternator and battery voltage will be the same and the voltage regulator monitors that voltage.

The lower the battery voltage the more output the alternator will produce in order to correct the situation but because a lead acid battery has a high internal resistance to accepting a charge the terminal voltage will quickly rise to the alternator regulated voltage and fool the alternator into thinking the battery is fully charged when the output will drop to the order of just a couple of amps.

Switch on the headlights or a similar load that will lower the battery voltage and the alternator will increase it's output again - but only by the amount of current the headlamps or other load is consuming.
It matters not what the alternator rated maximum output is, it is designed to provide only the necessary current and no more.

The only time an alternator should ever need to produce maximum output is when on a dedicated testbed and then only for a short duration to avoid damaging the unit. Testing the current output on a modern vehicle is not recommended except for the regulated voltage testing and a rule-of-thumb output test where all equipment is switched on and the engine speed raised while the battery voltage is monitored.

Most modern alternators use an internal voltage regulator but a few systems use a separate voltage regulator. No alternator rebuild would be complete without a regulator test and probably a new or replacement regulator, which is where the majority of charging system problems are, or the brush gear.
Assuming the wiring is ok, no alternator should suffer any harm if the voltage regulator and auxilliary diodes (if fitted) are in good order though fitting a defective or a discharged battery can cause it to overheat and be damaged.

The alternator usually just about stops producing an output when the battery voltage is in the region of 14.5/14.8 volts.
Your description indicates the voltage regulator is not working correctly - unless 40 amps was being consumed by the car equipment the alternator should not have been producing 40 amps.. I suggest you also have your battery tested

May 12, 2017 | 1988 Acura Legend

1 Answer

Alternator


Vehicles: any failing to keep its battery charged.

A vehicle unable to charge its own battery has one of 4 problems:
(a) alternator failure
(b) voltage regulator failure
(c) battery failure
(d) wiring problem between battery and alternator/voltage regulator.

One most modern vehicles (including 2002 Lexus RX300 - 2WD and AWD), the voltage regulator is an integral component of the alternator and is not separately serviceable.

In the US, one can get a free "charging system diagnosis" from the popular auto parts chains: AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts & Pep Boys. You needn't remove any parts from the car to get this diagnostic, since they can attach a diagnostic meter to the charging system in the parking lot. This diagnostic aid will tell you exactly which component has failed - battery, alternator or voltage regulator.

In case the vehicle is immobile, one can DIY (do it yourself) the diagnosis.
(a) inspect the wiring for corrosion/loose connections/loose connectors/etc.
(b) check alternator belt/pulley - if drive belt is properly turning the alternator pulley (no slippage/misrouting/etc.), then the mechanical tests are complete, and you'll need to continue testing the electrical performance of the charging system components.
(c) first component to test: battery
DIY test 1: remove battery from car and put battery on a 120VAC automotive battery charger and charge it fully (or just check it in the car with motor off, since the car's charging system is a type of automotive battery charger).
test parameter: a fully charged lead-acid automotive battery should read 12.45 volts on a VOM/DMM
DIY test 2: disassemble battery out of car after driving it to one of the auto parts chain stores (Advance/AutoZone/Pep Boys) for a free battery test. These testers will test the battery under load, which is not possible with just a DMM.
(d) if wiring is good, and battery tests good under load, then
the failed component is the alternator/voltage regulator - by process of elimination.
(e) DIY test 3: direct alternator/voltage regulator test (car must start and idle successfully to perform this test)
Start the car, and put a VOM/DMM across the terminals of the battery. Since the car is running, you'll be reading the output voltage of the alternator and not the output voltage of the battery. The acceptable ranges for alternator/voltage regulator output are:

ALTERNATOR CHARGING VOLTAGE

Most alternators that are charging properly should produce a voltage of about 13.8 to 14.2 volts at idle with the lights and accessories off. Always refer to the vehicle manufacturer's specifications. Many Asian vehicles, for example, have higher charging voltages of around 15 volts.

When the engine is first started, the charging voltage should rise quickly to about two volts above base battery voltage, then taper off, leveling out at the specified voltage.

The exact charging voltage will vary according to the battery's state of charge, the load on the vehicle's electrical system, and temperature. The lower the temperature the higher the charging voltage, and the higher the temperature the lower the charging voltage. The "normal" charging voltage on a typical application might be 13.9 to 15.1 volts at 77 degrees F. But at 20 degrees F. below zero, the charging voltage might be 14.9 to 15.8 volts. On a hot engine on a hot day, the normal charging voltage might drop to 13.5 to 14.3 volts.

Here are the full specs for installation of the 2002 Lexus RX300 alternator - you may be able to check these specs yourself (with a torque wrench), or pass them along to your mechanic.

Note: the VIN 8th digit should be "F" for the 2002 Lexus RX300 (2WD & AWD)

2002 Lexus RX300 (2WD and AWD) - 3.0L Engine, VIN "F" SFI DOHC

Alternator

Drive belt. Tension the belt to 170-180 lbs. for a new belt or 95-135 lbs. for a used belt.
Adjusting alternator lockbolt. Tighten the bolt to 13 ft.-lbs. (18 Nm).
Alternator pivot bolt. Tighten the bolt to 41 ft.-lbs. (56 Nm).

Glossary of acronyms
--------------------------------
DIY = do it yourself
DMM = Digital Multimeter
DOHC = Dual Overhead Cam
SFI = Sequential Fuel Injection
VOM = Volt Ohmmeter

References
----------------
How to test a Car Alternator - todayifoundout.com

Alternator & Charging System Checks - aa1car.com

Dec 26, 2011 | 2002 Lexus RX 300

1 Answer

Put in mew battery and it still says Check Charging System and Battery Light goes on


sounds to me like an alternator fault, you need to check with a volt meter the voltage in the battery before starting engine and after starting engine. with engine running voltage output should be around 14v. if no change in voltage, then its alternator. take car to place you bought battery from and get them to test it for you. ( usually free of charge ) so saves you messing about with it

Dec 08, 2011 | 2001 Ford Windstar

2 Answers

Alternator not charging


Possible short to the starter. I had a similar problem with my '91 mercury capri. I replaced the alternator and battery but the alternator would not charge the battery. My local mechanic spent hours tracking it down, but finally found the problem. Have not had a problem since. Good luck

Oct 14, 2011 | 1995 Honda Accord

1 Answer

1993 dodge caravan, over charging, replace the alternator, was tested and told it was bad, still over charging. Was told that the computer controls the voltage output, do I replace the computer system now,...


The computer has NOTHING to do with the alternator output.
The alternator is self regulating, with diodes, and rectifiers.
If the alternator is over charging it is because your battery is not accepting the charge, so the charger works harder and produces more to charge it, up to a point.
Was the alternator that you installed new or rebuilt ?
It could be another bad alternator.
Please let me know.

Feb 11, 2010 | 1993 Dodge Caravan

1 Answer

Interior lights on but car wont start


STARTING YOUR DIAGNOSIS
What happens when you attempt to start the engine? If nothing happens when you turn the key,"http://www.aa1car.com/library/2003/us20310.htm"to determine its state of charge. Many starters won't do a thing unless there is at least 10 volts available from the battery. A low battery does not necessarily mean the battery is the problem, though. The battery may have been run down by prolonged cranking while trying to start the engine. Or, the battery's low state of charge may be the result of a charging system problem. Either way, the battery needs to be recharged and tested.
If the battery is low, the next logical step might be to try starting the engine with another battery or a charger. If the engine cranks normally and roars to life, you can assume the problem was a dead battery, or a charging problem that allowed the battery to run down. If the battery accepts a charge and tests okay, checking the output of the charging system should help you identify any problems there.
A "http://www.aa1car.com/library/2002/cm10220.htm" that is working properly should produce a charging voltage of somewhere around 14 volts at idle with the lights and accessories off. When the engine is first started, the charging voltage should rise quickly to about two volts above base battery voltage, then taper off, leveling out at the specified voltage. The exact charging voltage will vary according to the battery's state of charge, the load on the electrical system, and temperature. The lower the temperature, the higher the charging voltage. The higher the temperature, the lower the charging voltage. The charging range for a typical alternator might be 13.9 to 14.4 volts at 80 degrees F, but increase to 14.9 to 15.8 volts at subzero temperatures.
If the charging system is not putting out the required voltage, is it the alternator or the regulator? Full fielding the alternator to bypass the regulator should tell you if it is working correctly. Or, take the alternator to a parts store and have it bench tested. If the charging voltage goes up when the regulator is bypassed, the problem is the regulator (or the engine computer in the case of computer-regulated systems). If there is no change in output voltage, the alternator is the culprit.
Many times one or more diodes in the alternator rectifier assembly will have failed, causing a drop in the unit's output. The alternator will still produce current, but not enough to keep the battery fully charged. This type of failure will show up on an oscilloscope as one or more missing humps in the alternator waveform. Most charging system analyzers can detect this type of problem.
thanks,please rate the solution positively.

Nov 06, 2009 | 1985 Buick Century

1 Answer

2002 sonata 2.4l battery dash light on. replaced alternator. Still not charging


I don't know if your car has an integrated regulator or not; some house the regulator in a section of the alternator case, others mount it remote from it. The regulator monitors the load and battery voltag,e primitively but effectively, and controls the current flowing through the field winding of the alternator to ground, changing the magnetic field intensity and consequently the voltage output of the alternator. The 'hot' end of the field is internally connected to the + output, the 'cold' end is controlled by a transistor inside the regulator which, in turn, is controlled by circuitry monitoring the system voltage.     Some alternators can be tested by sticking a wire through a specified opening, actually shorting the controlled end of the field to ground briefly, while monitoring the voltage across the battery, doing this though for seconds only. This essentially bypasses a suspected defective regulator; this causes the output voltage to rise instantly to its maximum of ~17 volts if the alternator is OK.
I don't recommend poking a wire at random into an available opening so having a service manual (Haynes-Chilton) would be nearly mandatory.

Sep 27, 2008 | Hyundai Motor 2002 Sonata

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